Pupil Premium

Purpose

The Government believes that the Pupil Premium, which is additional to main school funding, is the best way to address the current underlying inequalities between children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and their peers by ensuring that funding to tackle disadvantage reaches the pupils who need it most.The Pupil Premium was introduced in April 2011 and is allocated to schools to work with pupils who have been registered for free school meals at any point in the last six years (known as ‘Ever 6 FSM’) and for children whose parents are currently serving in the armed forces. Schools also receive funding for children who have been looked after continuously for more than six months. 

Pupils eligible for free school meals are those children if yourself or your partner recieves either: 

  • Universal Credit.
  • Income Support.
  • Income-based Jobseeker's Allowance.
  • Income-related Employment and Support Allowance.
  • Support under Part VI of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999.
  • The Guarantee element of State Pension Credit.
  • Child Tax Credit (provided you're not also entitled to Working Tax Credit and have an annual gross income of no more than £16,190)

Accountability

The Government believes that head teachers and school leaders should decide how to use the Pupil Premium. They are held accountable for the decisions they make through:

  • the performance tables which show the performance of disadvantaged pupils compared with their peers
  • the new Ofsted inspection framework, under which inspectors focus on the attainment of pupil groups, in particular those who attract the Pupil Premium.
  • the new reports for parents that schools now have to publish online.

Funding

In most cases the Pupil Premium is paid direct to schools, allocated to them for every pupil who receives free school meals. Schools decide how to use the funding, as they are best placed to assess what additional provision their pupils need. For pupils from low-income families in non-mainstream settings the local authority decides how to allocate the Pupil Premium. The authority must consult non-mainstream settings about how the Premium for these pupils should be used. Local authorities are responsible for looked after children and make payments to schools and academies where an eligible looked after child is on roll.

Common ways in which schools spend their pupil premium fund include:

  • Extra one-to-one or small-group support for children within the classroom.
  • Employing extra teaching assistants to work with classes.
  • Providing extra tuition for able children who receive the pupil premium
  • Providing music lessons for children whose families would be unable to pay for them.
  • Funding educational trips and visits.
  • Paying for additional help such as speech and language therapy or family therapy.
  • Investing in resources that boost children’s learning, such as laptops or tablets

Ultimately the idea of Pupil premium is a grant given to all schools to raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils of all abilities to reach their potential.

The pupil premium for 2017 to 2018 includes pupils recorded in the October 2017 school census who are known to have been eligible for free school meals (FSM) since May 2010, as well as those first known to be eligible at October 2017.

The grant will be

  • £935 per pupil for each Ever 6 FSM FTE in year groups 7 to 11, except where the pupil is allocated the LAC or post-LAC Premium
  • £1,900 per pupil for each post-LAC in year groups reception to year 11

The pupil premium plan 2017/18 shows how Bank View intends to use these funds to diminish the difference for disadvantaged pupils.

The pupil premium report 2016 /17 shows how these funds were used during the last academic year to narrow the gap between pupil premium and non pupil premium students.